Fisto the Robot… King of Red Light District in Fallout: New Vegas


The ESRB (Electronic Software Rating Bord) has put forth unusual comments about the upcoming Fallout: New Vegas.  Besides the usual:  Rating: Mature…Content descriptors: Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Sexual Content, Strong Language, Use of Drugs.  The ESRB States “…there is also an extended sequence suggesting (no depiction) sexual activity with a robot (e.g., “Fisto reporting for duty . . . Please assume the position,” “I suppose I should test you out . . . Servos active!”

So in case you thought the only thing Fallout 3 was missing was a sex-bot, then you are in luck.  After all, this is a post apocalyptic version of sin city.
The full funny description below.

This is an action role-playing game, set in a post-apocalyptic Mojave Desert, in which players assume the role of a survivor hero who investigates a mystery and performs a series of quests. Missions allow players to explore the Mojave Desert, surrounding casinos, and abandoned facilities; other quests involve combat with human and mutant survivors. Players use chainsaws, laser rifles, knives, and sledgehammers to kill enemies. Fighting can be frenetic and intense, highlighted by various camera effects (e.g., slow motion, blurring, screen shakes) and depictions of dismemberment, blood spray, and blood trails. In one sequence, players can choose to activate a collar bomb around a slave-woman’s neck, resulting in depictions of blood and gore. During the course of the game, players will encounter male and female prostitutes: the screen fades to black as suggestive dialogue is heard in the background (e.g., “Nice charlies, too! Give them a shake for the Ben-man, will ya?”); there is also an extended sequence suggesting (no depiction) sexual activity with a robot (e.g., “Fisto reporting for duty . . . Please assume the position,” “I suppose I should test you out . . . Servos active!” and “Something wrong with someone if they got to f**k a machine.”). The storyline sometimes references a fictional drug called “chems,” as well as “Day Trippers,” “cracked out junkies,” and “degenerate, drug-addicted killers.” Players’ Character can be seen consuming the drugs, which sometimes leads to a screen-blurring effect.


Airborne Gamer
Airborne Gamer
Gaming is my medicine and writing is my drug. Is it making sense now? "WELCOME TO WARP ZONE!"
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